Earth’s Most Remote Locations Revealed In ‘Lonely Planet’ Cartogram

Earth’s Most Remote Locations Revealed In ‘Lonely Planet’ Cartogram

One of our 15 favorite recent data visualizations

Cartograms—maps distorted so that instead of land area, they portray another quantity such as population or electoral-college votes—have existed since the early 1900s. Benjamin Hennig has refined the technique, and he made this cartogram to show the planet’s most remote places. He calculated the travel time from each spot on Earth to the nearest major city, then grew or shrunk the land at those points accordingly. The most remote spots appear biggest, while the densely settled areas, such as Europe, appear smallest.

Posted but not written by: Lou Sheehan

[ One of my intentions with this blog is to simply collect articles of interest to me for purposes of future reference. I do my best to indicate who has actually composed the articles. NONE of the articles have been written by me. Further, this ‘blog’ will contain various drafts of unknown writings just to be saved in the event they are needed by me, etc.– Louis Sheehan ]

Feel free to ignore this blog! I am intending to use it as a repository of various writings: drafts, doodles, etc. If there ARE any articles here, they are posted but not written by: Lou Sheehan

Advertisements

About masterkan

Louis Sheehan
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s